Posture of the month: CROW POSE (BAKASANA)

Bakasana is often the first arm balance that people learn. It’s a great feeling once we get lift off in this pose, but it can take a leap of faith the first time, a willingness to trust ourselves and overcome our fear of falling.

Bakasana is often the first arm balance that people learn. It’s a great feeling once we get lift off in this pose, but it can take a leap of faith the first time, a willingness to trust ourselves and overcome our fear of falling.

Preparatory poses

Plank pose and Vasisthasana are useful for building some upper body strength.

Cat Pose, Child’s Pose and Garland Pose (Malasana), are useful for allowing the spine to gently round

Baddha Konasana and Malasana are also useful for opening the inner groins and hips prior to performing Bakasana.

How to Perform
  • From Tadasana (Mountain Pose), inhale and raise the arms up and exhale and fold forward, bending the knees as much as you need to, placing the hands flat on the floor shoulder width apart, and about 10 inches (25 centimetres) in front of the feet, with the middle finger pointing forward and the other fingers spreading out from there.
  • With the feet close together, come on to tip toes, begin to bend the legs, widening the knees whilst keeping the bottom lifting high.
  • Begin to bend the elbows a little, lift the heels higher off the floor, and shift your weight forward into the hands to bring the knees on the upper arms as close to the arm pits as possible.
  • Strongly press the knees in against the upper arms, engage through your abdominal muscles, and trust in the support of your arms. Once the weight is in the hands, lift the feet fully off the floor, and straighten the arms as much as possible, pushing the floor away.
  • Keep the feet together and active, pressing through the ball joints of the big toes, and draw them into towards your buttocks. Keep the bottom high and allow the spine to round upwards.
  • Stay for 5 to 10 breaths, engaging mula bandha and keeping the head up and the gaze on the tip of the nose to help with your balance.
  • To exit the pose, either carefully lower the feet back to the floor and inhale to come back to standing, or lightly step or jump back to Chaturanga Dandasana and continue via your Vinyasa flow into your next pose.
  • In the second series ashtanga sequence, Bakasana may also be jumped into directly from Downward Facing Dog, although this take a great amount of control and lift through the bandhas, and therefore many years of practice for most people.
  • Bakasana can also be entered from Three Point Headstand, but that’s a story for another day . . .

Benefits
  • Strengthens the wrists, arms, shoulders and abdominal muscles
  • Quietens and focuses the mind
  • Helps to face and conquer the fear of falling forward, which can help build confidence and courage in other areas of our lives
  • Helps to build the strength and focus required for more challenging arm balancing poses
Modifications
  • To begin with, do not try to straighten the arms but keep the elbows bent as you learn to balance.
  • Practice transferring the weight back and forth from toes to hands, without actually taking the feet off the floor.
  • If you are worried about falling, place a large cushion in front of your hands to relieve the fear.
  • If it’s difficult to get lift off, try taking a block under the feet to give yourself a little extra help
Contraindications
  • Not suitable for those with current wrist injuries
  • Those with a current shoulder injury shoulder injury should also proceed with caution
  • Not suitable during pregnancy